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Build your confidence with Goose Bumps Clothing

The Breastfeeding Association has got the right information to help you along.  Read this great article by Simone, a breastfeeding councellor:-

I was so rapt to read Miranda Kerr’s thoughts on encouraging women not to give up breastfeeding because of the ‘stigma’ of feeding in public. Her observation that ‘there are more breasts being shown on a daily basis around the world in low-cut dresses than there are from breastfeeding’ is spot-on. Breasts aresexualised in our society, which is why many non-breastfeeders can’t separate their feelings about seeing boobs on display for the reason they were made, to feed babies.

In my role as a breastfeeding counsellor, I sometimes speak to pregnant women, who tell me that they are nervous about breastfeeding in public because they can’t imagine baring their breasts to anyone who may be walking past. Their main worries seem to be that men will stare at them in a sexual way or they will get disapproving looks or comments. But once those women become mums, thinking about who is around them when their baby is hungry for a feed is usually the last thing on their minds as they are so focused on meeting their baby’s needs. Having said that, when you are a breastfeeding newbie and there is a bit of extra fiddling going on to get bubs on, I can see how it might be embarrassing to have your boob out for what seems like ages. Once you get the hang of it and you can attach your baby in one clean movement, you’ll find that baby’s head covers your nipple, tops can be adjusted to cover the rest of the breast. Passers-by probably just think you’re holding your baby rather than feeding him.

Having breastfed three children for a total of 5 years, I have fed in cafés, restaurants, schools, shopping centres, parks, waiting rooms, hairdressing salons — the list goes on. I guess I don’t like to miss out on the action and, as I find those parents rooms in malls rather boring and a bit stinky, I’d rather sit and people-watch while I feed. Maybe I haven’t been paying attention, but I have never actually noticed a man staring at me (if anything, they usually turn away), and the only looks I get from other women are smiles that tell me, ‘Aww, how cute is that baby? I remember doing that!’

I was so rapt to read Miranda Kerr’s thoughts on encouraging women not to give up breastfeeding because of the ‘stigma’ of feeding in public. Her observation that ‘there are more breasts being shown on a daily basis around the world in low-cut dresses than there are from breastfeeding’ is spot-on. Breasts aresexualised in our society, which is why many non-breastfeeders can’t separate their feelings about seeing boobs on display for the reason they were made, to feed babies.

In my role as a breastfeeding counsellor, I sometimes speak to pregnant women, who tell me that they are nervous about breastfeeding in public because they can’t imagine baring their breasts to anyone who may be walking past. Their main worries seem to be that men will stare at them in a sexual way or they will get disapproving looks or comments. But once those women become mums, thinking about who is around them when their baby is hungry for a feed is usually the last thing on their minds as they are so focused on meeting their baby’s needs. Having said that, when you are a breastfeeding newbie and there is a bit of extra fiddling going on to get bubs on, I can see how it might be embarrassing to have your boob out for what seems like ages. Once you get the hang of it and you can attach your baby in one clean movement, you’ll find that baby’s head covers your nipple, tops can be adjusted to cover the rest of the breast. Passers-by probably just think you’re holding your baby rather than feeding him.

Having breastfed three children for a total of 5 years, I have fed in cafés, restaurants, schools, shopping centres, parks, waiting rooms, hairdressing salons — the list goes on. I guess I don’t like to miss out on the action and, as I find those parents rooms in malls rather boring and a bit stinky, I’d rather sit and people-watch while I feed. Maybe I haven’t been paying attention, but I have never actually noticed a man staring at me (if anything, they usually turn away), and the only looks I get from other women are smiles that tell me, ‘Aww, how cute is that baby? I remember doing that!’

Luckily in Australia (and many other countries around the world), women are protected by anti-discrimination laws and don’t have to hide away whenever their baby wants a feed, nor are they allowed to be denied a service because they have to breastfeed. Wearing clothes that are easy and discreet to breastfeed in will also give mums more confidence to feed while they are out. I’ve found wearing multiple layers works a treat — tops that can be unbuttoned with a stretchy singlet underneath, or one of those breastfeeding singlets with flip-down clasps worn with an open cardie or bolero, with the extra bonus of protecting your mummy tummy from chills and muffin-top spills.

You will also find our Goose Bumps Clothing Range great value at the moment.  We are moving a lot of our stock out to make room for our new Belice Range.  Keep you eye peeled on our website, you will be inspired by our new unique range.

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